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He verb to mitigate comes from the Latin word mitigāre and refers to minimize or alleviate something . When a phenomenon or an effect is mitigated, its intensity or rigor is reduced .

For example: "Natural phenomena cannot be avoided, but it is possible to mitigate their consequences", “The government promised to work to mitigate pollution in the San Pablo stream”, “My grandmother gave me a boldo tea to mitigate my stomach upset”.

Athletes, to name a case, often use various protective elements to mitigate any blows they may receive . Footballers, in this framework, use canilleras (Shin pads ), while archers (goalkeepers) employ gloves to cushion the balls. Volleyball players, meanwhile, appeal to kneepads to mitigate the impact of your knees against the ground in case of a fall.

Mitigating can also be understood as palliate or attenuate . Let's take the situation of hungry in the world: thinking about eliminating this scourge is an utopia, at least in the short term. Multiple economic, political and social reasons make it impossible to meet the nutritional needs of each human being in a matter of months or a few years. However, it is feasible alleviate hunger through state initiatives, non-governmental organization ventures and citizen donations. Although the problem is not resolved, the picture can be improved with input from different sectors.

The owner of a nightclub, on the other hand, can soundproof the building for sound insulation and mitigate the noise . So avoid conflicts with the neighbors.

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